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10   
Wachau - World Heritage
In the year 2000, the cultural landscape Wachau was added to the UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage list together with the Abbeys Melk and Göttweig and the old town of Krems.

The Wachau is a river landscape with a length of slightly more than 30 km between Krems an der Donau and Melk and is the breakthrough valley of the Danube through the Bohemian Massif. It lays adjacent to the Austrian granite and gneiss highlands. The highest elevations are the Jauerling (960 m) and Sandl (723 m). The Wachau lies on the border of two Lower Austrian regional landscapes, to the south the Mostviertel and to the north the Waldviertel. The Donauseitental and the Spitzer Graben also belong to the Wachau.

  • WINE

The Wachau wines are known worldwide for their excellent quality. The tradition of winegrowing has its' early origins at the time of the Roman settlement of the Wachau and experienced a first heyday under the rule of the Carolingians. In the Middle Ages, the Wachau wines were well known far beyond the borders of Austria. If you have an affinity with wine, the Wachau offers many opportunities to pursue your interests.
But not only the Wachau wines are worth a tasting; The nearby regions Kremstal, Kamptal and Traisental are also part of every wine tour in Lower Austria.

  • APRICOT

The Chinese already knew the apricot around 3000-2000 BC. The route of propagation in Western Europe may have been via Italy, Spain and France, while the Danube countries, according to recent research, received the apricot via the Pontus and the Donauweg. The oldest evidence to date for the term apricot "Maryln" in the Danube region can be found in a letter collection from the Starhemberg Archives in Eferding near Linz (Letter of July 23, 1509). In the capitulary of Charlemagne, who names all the fruits of culture at that time, there is no specific mention of the apricot, since it was counted as a peach from the 3rd until the 16th century. From the French "abricot" the name "Aprikose" spread to Western and Northern Germany, where it is still used today. In southern Germany, Switzerland and Austria the name "Marille", which probably stems from the Italian "armellino" established itself. This originated again from the Latin "armeniaca", meaning originating from Armenia. From the terms "Amarellen", "Morellen"the word "Marille" was formed.

  • HEURIGER

In Austria, the word "Heuriger" can be used to reference both a young wine or the locality where this wine is served. This "Heuriger" can both be a so-called "Buschenschank", the seasonally limited serving of wine by its' producers, or a restaurant operated as a "Heuriger" year-round. The authorisation for winemakers to legally sell their own wines in their homes without an explicit license can be traced back to a law issued by Emperor Joseph II. in the year 1784. Historically, this tradition enabled winemakers to present their wines and federweisser each year to the local population.
Wachau - World Heritage
In the year 2000, the cultural landscape Wachau was added to the UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage list together with the Abbeys Melk and Göttweig and the old town of Krems.

The Wachau is a river landscape with a length of slightly more than 30 km between Krems an der Donau and Melk and is the breakthrough valley of the Danube through the Bohemian Massif. It lays adjacent to the Austrian granite and gneiss highlands. The highest elevations are the Jauerling (960 m) and Sandl (723 m). The Wachau lies on the border of two Lower Austrian regional landscapes, to the south the Mostviertel and to the north the Waldviertel. The Donauseitental and the Spitzer Graben also belong to the Wachau.

  • WINE

The Wachau wines are known worldwide for their excellent quality. The tradition of winegrowing has its' early origins at the time of the Roman settlement of the Wachau and experienced a first heyday under the rule of the Carolingians. In the Middle Ages, the Wachau wines were well known far beyond the borders of Austria. If you have an affinity with wine, the Wachau offers many opportunities to pursue your interests.
But not only the Wachau wines are worth a tasting; The nearby regions Kremstal, Kamptal and Traisental are also part of every wine tour in Lower Austria.

  • APRICOT

The Chinese already knew the apricot around 3000-2000 BC. The route of propagation in Western Europe may have been via Italy, Spain and France, while the Danube countries, according to recent research, received the apricot via the Pontus and the Donauweg. The oldest evidence to date for the term apricot "Maryln" in the Danube region can be found in a letter collection from the Starhemberg Archives in Eferding near Linz (Letter of July 23, 1509). In the capitulary of Charlemagne, who names all the fruits of culture at that time, there is no specific mention of the apricot, since it was counted as a peach from the 3rd until the 16th century. From the French "abricot" the name "Aprikose" spread to Western and Northern Germany, where it is still used today. In southern Germany, Switzerland and Austria the name "Marille", which probably stems from the Italian "armellino" established itself. This originated again from the Latin "armeniaca", meaning originating from Armenia. From the terms "Amarellen", "Morellen"the word "Marille" was formed.

  • HEURIGER

In Austria, the word "Heuriger" can be used to reference both a young wine or the locality where this wine is served. This "Heuriger" can both be a so-called "Buschenschank", the seasonally limited serving of wine by its' producers, or a restaurant operated as a "Heuriger" year-round. The authorisation for winemakers to legally sell their own wines in their homes without an explicit license can be traced back to a law issued by Emperor Joseph II. in the year 1784. Historically, this tradition enabled winemakers to present their wines and federweisser each year to the local population.